Three Lone Girls: Three Women Collecting Stories on Climate Change in Pakistan

Stories are what inspire and drive us to action. It is the stories we tell about a cause that help bring it to life and move people towards action. Unfortunately, there is an absence of compelling stories on climate change around the world. People in many countries are experiencing climate change in unique and different ways, yet all we usually get to see is a generalized representation of their suffering.

Girls

Three women from Karachi, Pakistan travelled across the country to collect stories about the day-to-day experiences of people around climate change. They visited more than 16 locations in Sindh, Punjab, Gilgit-Baltistan, and Chitral in the span of five months. It was a sincere attempt to highlight the voices of people whose lives are already being impacted by climate change in Pakistan.

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Pakistan is the eighth most affected country in the world due to extreme weather events (German Watch, 2019). Its people, occupying a diverse range of geographical landscapes, face different challenges to climate change and through this project these women were able to record their stories of struggles, suffering, adaptation and resilience.

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This is the first project of its kind in Pakistan to document people’s narratives around climate change and was funded by the National Geographic Society. The grant was awarded to Amber Ajani who is an environmentalist and currently works at the UN Office in Germany. The core project team also included Saresh Khemani, an educationist affiliated with Habib University and Haya Fatima Iqbal who is a documentary filmmaker.

Read more about this great initiative: https://www.dawn.com/news/1502583/three-lone-girls

Follow them on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ccstoriespakistan

Follow them on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ccstoriespakistan

Author: ismailimail

Independent, civil society media featuring Ismaili Muslim community, inter and intra faith endeavors, achievements and humanitarian works.

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