The Guardian reports on the impact of AKTC’s work in Hazrat Nizamuddin Basti to solve water scarcity problems

The three wonders of the ancient world solving modern water problems

In Peru, Kenya and India, NGOs are helping communities overcome water scarcity using wisdom from the past

The Chand baoli near Jaipur extends almost 100ft into the ground, making it one of the deepest and largest stepwells in India. (Photograph: dbimages/Alamy via The Guardian)
The Chand baoli near Jaipur extends almost 100ft into the ground, making it one of the deepest and largest stepwells in India. (Photograph: dbimages/Alamy via The Guardian)

One such baoli restored by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC) was built in the 14th century in Hazrat Nizamuddin Basti, a medieval village in Delhi named after Sufi saint, Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliya. In 2008, parts of the baoli walls collapsed due to sewage water seeping into the structure and the local residents using it as a rubbish dump. The pool was drained and the rubbish, garbage and sludge that had accumulated over the past 700 years was removed to reach the foundation of the baoli some 80 feet below ground level. While the water in the baoli is still not potable, it can be used for cleaning and agriculture.

Workers carry out conservation work at Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliyas baoli in New Delhi. (Photograph: Anindito Mukherjee/EPA via The Guardian)
Workers carry out conservation work at Hazrat Nizamuddin Auliyas baoli in New Delhi. (Photograph: Anindito Mukherjee/EPA via The Guardian)

Published: Wednesday 19 August 2015 08.24 EDT – for The Guardian:

By Nivedita Khandekar in Delhi, Geoffrey Kamadi in Nairobi, and Dan Collyns in Puno.

Discover, Explore and Learn more by reading the entire article at:
The Guardian | Global development professionals network | Water in development | The three wonders of the ancient world solving modern water problems

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